George Edward Payne Sr.
Friday, September 26, 2008
George Edward Payne Sr., 88, a machinist at the Navy Yard, the old Washington Star newspaper and the Government Printing
Office, died Sept. 4 at his home in  Springfield. He had dementia. Mr. Payne, a native Washingtonian, spent his boyhood moving
between relatives and an orphanage after his father died and his mother tried to provide for her four children.
She remarried, but Mr. Payne and his stepfather clashed over the older man's drinking and the boy was sent to reform school,
according to Mr. Payne's children. An aunt intervened through the court system and took him in.
Mr. Payne attended the old  Western High School and then began working at the Washington Navy Yard during World War II,
machining the rifling sleeves for 16-inch gun barrels for Navy warships. After the war, he went to work for the Star. Mr. Payne
retired from the GPO in 1981.
He volunteered at St. John's Episcopal Church in Georgetown, working on its "Chapel of the Carpenter," which was built by
volunteers. He later added a small organ and hung an oxen yoke, donated by his uncle, behind the altar. He also made
peppermint candy wreaths for the church's annual Christmas fundraiser.
His wife, Hazel Virginia Daniels Payne, died in 1990.
Survivors include five children, Joanne Virginia Field of Berkeley Springs, W.Va., Mary Elizabeth Lawson of Woodbridge, George
Edward Payne Jr. of Ocean Pines, Md., Robert Emmett Payne of Alexandria and Deborah Lee Baldwin of Stafford; a brother; 13
grandchildren; 19 great-grandchildren; and six great-great-grandchildren.
-- Patricia Sullivan

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George Edward Payne Sr.

George Edward Payne Sr., 88, a machinist at the Navy Yard, the old Washington Star
newspaper and the Government Printing Office, died Sept. 4 at his home in Springfield.
He had dementia.

Mr. Payne, a native Washingtonian, spent his boyhood moving between relatives and an
orphanage after his father died and his mother tried to provide for her four children.
She remarried, but Mr. Payne and his stepfather clashed over the older man's drinking
and the boy was sent to reform school,
according to Mr. Payne's children. An aunt intervened through the court system and took
him in.
Mr. Payne attended the old  Western High School and then began working at the
Washington Navy Yard during World War II,
machining the rifling sleeves for 16-inch gun barrels for Navy warships. After the war, he
went to work for the Star. Mr. Payne
retired from the GPO in 1981.
He volunteered at St. John's Episcopal Church in Georgetown, working on its "Chapel of
the Carpenter," which was built by
volunteers. He later added a small organ and hung an oxen yoke, donated by his uncle,
behind the altar. He also made
peppermint candy wreaths for the church's annual Christmas fundraiser.
His wife, Hazel Virginia Daniels Payne, died in 1990.
Survivors include five children, Joanne Virginia Field of Berkeley Springs, W.Va., Mary
Elizabeth Lawson of Woodbridge, George
Edward Payne Jr. of Ocean Pines, Md., Robert Emmett Payne of Alexandria and
Deborah Lee Baldwin of Stafford; a brother; 13
grandchildren; 19 great-grandchildren; and six great-great-grandchildren.